MMPI-2 Adult Interpretive Report (10.0) Sample

Below you will find a sample of the MMPI-2 ADULT INTERPRETIVE REPORT including graphic printouts of the MMPI-2 clinical scales profile. As you can see, this patient's MMPI-2 performance yielded a 2-7/7-2 two-point code. This sample report shows you some of the many features provided by this program. To download a free trial of this program, click on the "Free Trial " button at the bottom of the page.


MMPI-2 ADULT INTERPRETIVE REPORT

Donald S. Strassberg, Ph.D., ABPP

Leslie M. Cooper, Ph.D.

VALIDITY AND CLINICAL SCALES PROFILES

T-SCORES OF THE MMPI-2 VALIDITY, CLINICAL, & CONTENT SCALES

VALIDITY SCALE SCORES
CLINICAL SCALE SCORES
CONTENT SCALE SCORES
  • L-52
  • F-67
  • K-62
  • VRIN-55
  • TRIN-52
  • 1(Hs)-66
  • 2(D)-78
  • 3(Hy)-61
  • 4(Pd)-52
  • 5(Mf)-56
  • 6(Pa)-57
  • 7(PT)-77
  • 8(Sc)-60
  • 9(MA)-59
  • 0(Si)-54
  • ANX-67
  • FRS-58
  • OBS-69
  • DEP-71
  • HEA-67
  • BIZ-51
  • ANG-49
  • CYN-53
  • ASP-51
  • TPA-66
  • LSE-66
  • SOD-49
  • FAM-52
  • WRK-58
  • TRT-48

VALIDITY SCALES PROFILE INTERPRETATION

This is most likely a valid profile. The individual appears to have understood the directions and to have been cooperative, careful, straightforward, and honest in responding to the test items. Consequently, the clinical scale profile is likely to present accurately the individual's current psychological status.

MMPI-2 CLINICAL SCALES PROFILE INTERPRETATION

This client's clinical scale profile corresponds to the 2-7/7-2 two-point code type. The 2-7 (7-2) is a common pattern, occurring among approximately 2.5% (1.7%) of male and 5.4% (1.2%) of female psychiatric inpatients and outpatients.

Personality Features

This profile suggests a pattern characterized by chronic anxiety [ANX], tension, distress, depression [DEP], and obsessive-compulsive features [OBS]. These individuals hold rigidly high standards for themselves and are chronically disappointed with their performance. They have strong needs for achievement and recognition which are constantly frustrated, leading to feelings of inadequacy, lack of confidence, and low self-esteem [LSE].

These are worriers who regularly over-react to even minor sources of stress, irritation, and frustration. They are intrapunitive and often report feeling overwhelmed and pessimistic. Somatic complaints (many of which are rather vague, including fatigability) are often seen [HEA]. Their subjective distress and physical complaints are likely to be particularly severe when under stress (e.g., following what they perceive as a "failure"). Despite their symptomatology, these are often very accomplished people.

Interpersonal Dynamics

Patients with this profile often have the capacity for close interpersonal relationships, yet they can become rather passive and dependent, eliciting nurturant behavior from others, especially when under stress. They may also show difficulty being appropriately assertive.

Additional Personality Characteristics (Single Scale)

Scale 1 (Hs)

Individuals scoring in this range of Scale 1 usually present themselves as physically ill, offering a number of somatic complaints [HEA], some of which are likely to be vague. They tend to be overly concerned about their physical well-being. Chronic weakness, sleep difficulty, and/or lack of energy may be seen. They may be whiny, demanding, complaining, selfish, pessimistic, inefficient, cynical, and dissatisfied. They tend to express anger indirectly. They usually show little psychological insight.

Text-Referenced Content Scale

Other Elevated Content Scales

Additional Information

Therapeutic Implications

Patients with the 2-7/7-2 profile type are often very motivated for psychotherapy because of their high level of subjective distress. Many are also sufficiently psychologically minded to make good use of therapy. They often seek support and reassurance, and can be overly guilt-ridden and self-critical in therapy. Their tendency to obsesses (particularly when coded 7-2) can make for unproductive periods during sessions. They do not tend to terminate therapy prematurely. In fact, some may become dependent on the therapeutic relationship and be reluctant to terminate. The prognosis for therapy is usually quite good. A variety of cognitive/behavioral techniques are particularly likely to be of value including cognitive restructuring (e.g., learning to dispute the unreasonable demands they make on themselves) and relaxation training. If their level of anxiety or depression becomes disabling, a pharmacologic component to treatment may prove beneficial in not only relieving stress, but in permitting the patient to maximize the value of psychotherapeutic interventions.

Diagnostic Impressions

Psychiatric patients obtaining this profile are likely to receive one of the following DSM-IV diagnoses:

AXIS I:
ANXIETY DISORDER
300.02 Generalized Anxiety Disorder
300.01 Panic Disorder Without Agoraphobia (coded 2-7-8)
300.30 Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (coded 2-7-8-3)
MOOD DISORDER
300.40 Dysthymic Disorder
296.5x Bipolar Disorder, Depressed (usually coded 2-7-8)
296.2x/3x Major Depressive Disorder (coded 2-7-4or 2-7-8)
ADJUSTMENT DISORDER
309.24 Adjustment Disorder With Anxiety
309.00 Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood
ALCOHOL/SUBSTANCE ABUSE
305.00 Alcohol Abuse (usually coded 2-7-4)
303.90 Alcohol Dependence (usually coded 2-7-4)
304.xx Substance Dependence (usually coded 2-7-4)
305.xx Substance Abuse (usually coded 2-7-4)
OTHER
295.9x Schizophrenia, Undifferentiated Type (coded 2-7-8-0)
AXIS II
301.82 Avoidant PD (coded 2-7-0)
301.60 Dependent PD
301.40 Obsessive-Compulsive PD
301.22 Schizotypal PD (coded 2-7-8)

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